Advanced Concurrency Theory Holger Hermanns, Daniel Stan

News

31.01.2018

Next meeting this friday (and updated schedule)

Dear Students,

After this long Christmas break (happy new year !), I recall you that our next meeting takes place this Friday. Due to several time constraints, the next meeting will start early again (8:00) and consist only in one talk. The updated schedule... Read more

Dear Students,

After this long Christmas break (happy new year !), I recall you that our next meeting takes place this Friday. Due to several time constraints, the next meeting will start early again (8:00) and consist only in one talk. The updated schedule follows, please take note also on the dates for write-ups and reviews :

02/02/2017 at 8:00 to 9:00Timed and Priced Timed Automata (Giles Nies) by Tom

09/02/2017 at 8:30 to 10:00: Probabilistic automata and PCCS  (Daniel Stan) by Lukas and
and Simulation Relations (Holger Hermanns) by Lars

16/02/2017: Submission of your write-up (draft)

9/03/2017: Review submission

30/03/2017: Final version of the write-up (including feedbacks from the reviews)

See you on Friday.

--
Daniel STAN

19.11.2017

Feedback meeting (updated schedule)

Dears students,

Thank you for all your interesting presentations on Petri Nets, the grades will soon ve registered in the system. We will give you individual feedback as part of the session on December 8, together with putting one or two short presentations on... Read more

Dears students,

Thank you for all your interesting presentations on Petri Nets, the grades will soon ve registered in the system. We will give you individual feedback as part of the session on December 8, together with putting one or two short presentations on Petri Nets on stage. Since there was no single presentation in the calibration session standing out qualitywise, we will improvise these presentations somewhat.

You can find below a schedule update (some changes are there), with your "topical mentor" assigned.

[…]

You should contact your mentor at the latest two weeks before your individual presentation. We expect you to give a 40 minutes presentation, with 10 minutes slots for questions and setup in between.

Have a nice week-end !

-- 
Daniel

05.11.2017

Assignment and next (calibration) meeting

Dear students,

Thank you for your answers to the poll, that allowed us to compile the
previsionnal schedule for this semester, you can find below the assignements
and dates.

[Schedule updated in more recent news]

I will send you a separate mail with who... Read more

Dear students,

Thank you for your answers to the poll, that allowed us to compile the
previsionnal schedule for this semester, you can find below the assignements
and dates.

[Schedule updated in more recent news]

I will send you a separate mail with who is in charge of supervising you for your topic.
I also recall you of our next meeting, on Friday November 17, when you should
give a small presentation (5min) on the topic of Petri Net, without audience.
I suggest that we start at 9am as the course is not crowded, in the following
(randomly generated) order:

9:00 Julian
9:08 Lars
9:16 Sanny
9:24 Tom
9:32 Anna
9:40 Felix
9:48 Lukas

Please feel free to raise any comment or issue,

Have a nice afternoon,
-- 
Daniel

 

23.10.2017

Topic and date selection

Dear students,

The poll for the topic selection is now online. You can find it in the menu, or directly at this address:
https://framadate.org/RhEHh1cDM6Qm99kt

I also remind you that our next meeting is on Friday November 17 at 8:00.

Have a nice day... Read more

Dear students,

The poll for the topic selection is now online. You can find it in the menu, or directly at this address:
https://framadate.org/RhEHh1cDM6Qm99kt

I also remind you that our next meeting is on Friday November 17 at 8:00.

Have a nice day !

--
Daniel

 
 

Advanced Concurrency Theory Seminar

Audience

This Seminar addresses Master and Bachelor students in Computer Science and related study programs that mandate participation in at least one Seminar.

The first meeting

The first meeting takes place on Friday October 20, at 10:30 in room 528 of E1 3. Next meetings will be located in the same room, on Friday, at 8:00 to 10:00.

Structure

  • Calibration - Friday November 17th from 8:00 to 10:00 : 5 minutes presentation on Petri Nets  (you will only present without any audience, you are not admitted to participate in the presentations of the others; we will ask the presenter of the presentation that we consider best to redo the presentation in public.)
    10% of the final grade
  • Presentations - December and February: 45 minutes presentations, one or two presentations per week,
    you probably cannot present all the material in these 45 minutes - you need to construct a good story out of the material
    31% of the final grade
  • Writeup - draft until some time in February (23:59), final version until March (23:59): writeup of your presentation in a book chapter style.
    like in your presentation, you need to construct a good story and explain it properly therein (examples, exercises, etc.)
    29% of the final grade
  • Reviews - until some time in March (23:59): you will be assigned two write-ups of your colleagues, you need to read them and give a thorough written feedback
    10% of the final grade 
  • Active participation: this involves feedback to the presentations of your colleagues and, most importantly, participation in the "scientific" discussions during and after the presentations
    20% of the final grade

Overview of the seminar

This Seminar has two goals:

  1. to practice and to refine the skills of "scientific presentation", "scientific argumentation", and "scientific reflection";
  2. to learn more about various theoretically challenging and practically relevant concurrency models.

Despite its importance and more than three decades of highly active research, concurrent systems are still less understood than sequential systems. A comprehensive model of concurrency, comparable to Turing machines and the lambda calculus for sequential programs, is yet to be established for concurrency. In our seminar we will study some of the most important models and results for concurrency, and we will see why concurrency is so difficult to understand.

The goal of the seminar is to provide a broad overview of the theoretical underpinnings of concurrency theory. For example, we will discuss popular process algebras such as CCS, the pi calculus and mobile ambients. Further topics include input/output automata, modal transition systems and Petri nets as well as models of true (i.e. non-interleaving) concurrency.  In addition we will look at various concurrent automata models which in different senses extend finite automata. Every such extension is motivated by a concrete practical application area. This way, we can reason about timed behaviour of real-time systems; describe behaviour of reactive systems using languages composed not of finite but of infinite words; specify classes of models using a modal automata; or reason about randomness using probabilistic automata. We will see how these modelling feature are crucial for the respective application areas.

We selected a number of papers for each of these areas. Participation in the seminar includes writing a paper  to give some motivation, examples, links to relevant literature and to provide the theoretical background of the selected topic. Furthermore, each participant gives a formal presentation (approx. 45 minutes) to explain the topic to the audience.

List of papers (incomplete)

  1. Process Algebra (in the true sense)

    M. Hennessy, R. Milner: Algebraic Laws for Nondeterminism and Concurrency

    R. Milner: A complete axiomatisation for observational congruence of finite-state behaviours

  2. Bisimulation minimization

    J. C. Fernandez. An implementation of an efficient algorithm for bisimulation equivalence

  3. Simulation relations
    Joachim Parrow,Peter Sjödin: Multiway synchronization verified with coupled simulation

  4. Parametrized verification
    S. German, A. Sistla, Reasoning about Systems with Many Processes
    Emerson, Kahlon: Reducing Model Checking of the Many to the Few

  5. Model based testing

    R. De Nicola, M. Hennessy:Testing Equivalences for Processes

    J. Tretmans. Model Based Testing with Labelled Transition Systems

  6. Interface Automata

    L. de Alfaro, T. A. Henzinger: Interface Automata

    (for further context, see also: L. de Alfaro: Game Models for Open Systems)

  7. Probabilistic automata and PCCS

    M. Stoelinga: An introduction to probabilistic automata. Bulletin of the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science, 2002

    C. Baier: On algorithmic verification methods for probabilistic systems (chapter 4)

  8. Stochastic automata

    J.-P. Katoen, P. R. D'Argenio: General Distributions in Process Algebra.

  9. Timed and priced timed automata

    an overview of priced TA models: P. Bouyer, U. Fahrenberg, K. G. Larsen, N. Markey. Quantitative analysis of real-time systems using priced timed automata

  10. Hybrid automata

    R. Alur, C. Courcoubetis, N. Halbwachs, T.A. Henzinger, P.-H. Hod, X. Nicollin, A. Olivero, J. Sifakis, S. Yovine: The algorithmic analysis of hybrid systems

  11. Multicore verification
    A. Betts, N. Chong, A.F. Donaldson, J. Ketema, S. Qadeer, P. Thomson, J. Wickerson: The Design and Implementation of a Verification Technique for GPU Kernels



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